Thursday, 18 December 2014

Have you been looking to find replacements for some of Siemens's discontinued RIA kits?

Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics (formerly DPC) and Diasorin will discontinue the supply of their RIA product lines and stop all assistance for these products in 2014    












We have an extensive list of ELISA kits that can help you replace the RIA's now consigned to history

Salimetrics are regarded as the world leader for Salivary Assay Technology (independent research)

To view our full range of products use these link's



Still require assistance, contact your local office for advice:




Monday, 15 December 2014

Thinking of adding Salivary Measures to your Psychology Research in 2015? just one call and we will visit your University to explain - Saliva Collection, Saliva Testing or attend one of our Spit Camp Training Days



Is your University offering degree courses covering Psychology or undertaking Psychology research?

Have you considered adding Quantitative measures by way of Saliva Testing

Salimetrics How to pages will answer the questions you may have


Advancing Research Through Knowledge

So are you ready to add salivary measures to your research? Read Salimetrics' key guides in order to gain a basic understanding of using saliva and its relevant biological data for your research.


Recommended Reading 


Description: Start here to learn about the global salivary research network, salivary analytes, and the basic steps to incorporate saliva into your research study. Also identify how Salimetrics can assist you throughout your project life-cycle. 


Description: Then view this brochure for an overview of salivary analytes in research and the research tools we provide to help you in the analyte selection process. 


Description: Soon you'll be ready to start collecting saliva, but make sure you collect right! View this brochure for an overview of recommended collection volumes, Salimetrics tools for researchers, and available collection devices. 


Description: If you want accurate results, make sure you choose a reliable testing lab! In this brochure, we’ve put together a list of features and services to look for when searching for your saliva testing lab 


Length: 13 Pages

Description: Learn the proper techniques and methods for saliva collection, handling, and storage with this pocket guide 

If you prefer we can visit your University or Institution and talk directly with staff, students

Or book to attend our popular Spit Camp

Just e mail: europe@salimetrics.com to arrange this free service

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

Salimetrics One World: Profiles of International Leaders in Salivary Bioscience: Dr Evdokia (Evi) Varamenti, Sports Biochemist, Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence, Doha, Qatar

Each month we will feature an expert from the Salimetrics Saliva Research Community. We will bring together University Researchers around the World in order to encourage the sharing of ideas. We want to encourage Collaborative Research and to maximise Grant Applications / Awards in these challenging economic times. We have made it possible for you to communicate directly with the "Expert" featured. 
This Month Dr Evi Varamenti

Evi's Profile
I am currently working at ‘Aspire Academy for Sports Excellence’ in Doha, Qatar (www.aspire.qa). My specific role is that of a Sports Biochemist within the Sport Science Department, where I have the pleasure to collaborate with Dr. Marco Cardinale - Head of Physiology and Biochemistry, and Dr. Zoran Nikolovski - Senior Sport Biochemist. Our major focus is on the understanding and monitoring of growth and maturation markers.  Other areas of interest include observing the variation of different oxidative stress, inflammation and immune status markers and their responses to various types of training and environmental conditions.

Before joining Aspire Academy, I worked with many Greek Olympic medalists and amateur athletes from a range of sports including; water polo, swimming, football, basketball and athletics.

1. Can you tell us about the major themes in your research program?

In Aspire Academy, the majority of our work is focused on our full time scholarship holders whom are young male athletes aged 12-18 years old.  The athletes are from a wide range of sports including athletics, football, table tennis, squash and fencing just to name a few.  Our scope is diverse:  to provide information in relation to training load and recovery, to establish reference values for this specific population i.e. adolescent student –athletes of Arab origin - who are still in the process of maturation, and to conduct applied research in the field of biochemical and genetic markers for the purpose of talent identification, monitoring of growth and of anti-doping. 

2. If you had to pick 1 publication in the past 5 years as the "best of your best", what would it be and why?

In terms of salivary analysis, our best study has not been published yet but will be coming soon inshallah!  We have preliminary results regarding growth, maturation and performance, both before and after peak high velocity (PHV).  However we are holding off and plan to publish after our athletes have been observed for a longer period of time (e.g. two-three years)

3. How did you get interested in using saliva in your research?

I have been interested in this area of research for a long time as it is a non-invasive method which means we can explore a wide range of markers and we can do it more regularly if needed, without upsetting or hindering the athletes.  For example in Aspire Academy we are working with young boys (pubertal and adolescents athletes). For these athletes and - I assume for all athletes regardless of their age - the collection of venous blood is not a convenient practice.  Saliva collection is a simpler and noninvasive method, which is much more acceptable to athletes than the repeated blood samplings. I see saliva research as a world of opportunities.

4. Which salivary analytes are you working with?

We consistently examine testosterone, cortisol, sIgA, DHEA-S and alpha-amylase and many additional markers related to specific projects.

5. How has working with saliva changed the direction of your research plans?

Due to its simplicity of collection and its non-invasive nature, this method has given us more flexibility to test athletes repeatedly in the field (real conditions) as well as to collect more frequent samples (more time points during a specific test).

6. What analyte is not measured in saliva now that you would hope could be measured in the future?

It would be very interesting if we could use saliva to study more indicators related to the training load, inflammation as IL-10, INF-gamma and some adipokines or markers related to pituitary hormones. Also it would be great if with only one kit, we could simultaneous analyze more markers!
Recently the measurement of salivary nitric oxide [as total and as separate values of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-)] has attracted the interest of researchers due to its relation to muscle soreness and repair, and has showed proportional responses to Alpha Amylase.

7. What advice would you give young investigators who might be considering working with saliva in their research?

I would love to see more young investigators involved in this area.  My key advice would be that, although the saliva collection is an attractive technique, we need to be very consistent and standardize our method prior to starting the collection of this specimen. Otherwise many factors could possibly influence the quality and composition of the sample and thus effect the results.
From the first steps of collection we follow standard handling and storage processes in order to avoid blood contaminations and reduce viscosity. Further we give specific instructions and we try to control the timing of food and drink. Two important factors that we should take into consideration for specific markers are the flow rate and the diurnal variation. Then during the analysis “per se” we have to check among others the calibration of pipettes (to ensure consistent results), the timing of adding reagents, the wash (automatically or by hand), the temperature and humidity of the lab, the incubations (foil or dark room), etc.

8. Tell us something about you (a hobby or special interest) that we would be surprised to know?


What people may don’t know about me -especially here in Qatar, is that I was a water polo athlete for many years, a member of the Greek National water polo team and then went on to be a coach for many A1 teams.  Since i still have a very strong passion for water sports, i have recently taken up ‘stand up paddling’. Fortunately the weather is very good here for most of the year.

To contact Evi directly e mail: evdokia.varamenti@aspire.qa

To feature in this series e mail: europe@salimetrics.com

Tuesday, 25 November 2014

Salimetrics One World: Profiles of International Leaders in Salivary Bioscience: Professor Angela Clow, Professor of Psychophysiology based in the Department of Psychology at the University of Westminster, London

Each month we will feature an expert from the Salimetrics Saliva Research Community. We will bring together University Researchers around the World in order to encourage the sharing of ideas. We want to encourage Collaborative Research and to maximise Grant Applications / Awards in these challenging economic times. We have made it possible for you to communicate directly with the "Expert" featured. 

This month Professor Angela Clow

Angela's Profile:

Angela Clow is a Professor of Psychophysiology based in the Department of Psychology at the University of Westminster.   Angela is trained in neuroscience and psychology and likes to work at the interface of these disciplines.  For her PhD (Institute of Psychiatry, London) she explored the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs, during her post-doctoral studies (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London) she developed an interest in the biochemistry of stress. In 1989 she joined the University of Westminster where she became a founder member of the interdisciplinary Psychophysiology and Stress Research Group. 

Her current research investigates the physiological pathways by which stress and well-being can affect health and performance.  In particular she studies daily patterns of cortisol secretion, a hormone important in the regulation of day-night cycles as well as stress responding.  She is particularly interested in the ways exercise, light and season can affect health and performance.  Her work has been funded by the Wellcome Trust, ESRC, NIHR, the Bial Foundation, the British Academy and the Nuffield Trust.  She has published over 130 peer-reviewed papers, 5 books, and 31 book chapters or reviews.  Angela is a National Teaching Fellow and a frequent public speaker.  

Interview with Angela:

1. Can you tell us about the major themes in your research program?  

I am very interested in using the cortisol awakening response (CAR) as an index of circadian function in heath and disease.

2. If you had to pick 1 publication in the past 5 years as the "best of your best", what would it be and why? 

I am particularly proud of a small paper we published this year: Clow A, Law R, Evans P, Vallence A-M, Hodyl NA, Goldsworthy MR, Rothwell JC, Ridding MC.  Day differences in the cortisol awakening response predict day differences in synaptic plasticity in the brain.  Stress 17, 219–223 (2014).  This paper is the first to investigate the role of the CAR using transcranial magnetic stimulation.  The finding of a link with brain plasticity is the first direct evidence linking the CAR with brain function.

3. How did you get interested in using saliva in your research?

I used to study neuropharmacology in rodent brains (Institute of Psychiatry, London).  When I moved to the University of Westminster in 1989 that was no longer possible so I had to be more imaginative – saliva was the answer!

4. Which salivary analytes are you working with? 

We mostly study the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion but have also measured DHEA and melatonin in saliva samples.

5. How has working with saliva changed the direction of your research plans? 

Yes!  Psychophysiology is very broad in its relevance. We have been able to study a very diverse range of research questions using the same methodology (i.e. determination of salivary cortisol secretion).

6. What analyte is not measured in saliva now that you would hope could be measured in the future? 

Oxytocin – this is a potentially important moderator of the effects of stress on patterns of cortisol secretion. 

7. What advice would give young investigators who might be considering working with saliva in their research?

This is a very exciting area of research but take very great care over your methodology – timing is everything.

8. Tell us something about you (a hobby or special interest) that we would be surprised to know? 

I like gardening and bird watching!

Angela's Homepage

View Angela's Citations on Google Scholar 

To contact Angela to talk about her research e mail:  clowa@wmin.ac.uk

To feature your research on our blog contact: europe@salimetrics.com